From Terry’s PI Files – Bizarre Family Relations & The Shawarma Shop

Now that I’m more or less out of the game, there’s a few of my more bizarre cases that I always wanted to write about but couldn’t. Just to let you know, no names will be mentioned, or which business involved (as I understand it, it’s since changed ownership), but it was beyond weird.

A few years back, a young attractive woman walks into the shop with a number of kids. She asks for some information on what I did, what was possible and what could be done. She explains that she and her family owns a restaurant, and that her husband has been having an affair with someone there during the day. She needed to have proof and it had to be indisputable. A typical case in the private eye biz, more or less. A few nights later, I was putting up a disguised smoke detector in the kitchen and a recorder. It has a good resolution, battery life, and I was able to install it quickly. Angled it. Pointed it. All done, and now time to wait and see.

Image

A Smoke Detector… but also a disguised Hidden Camera System all in one

I didn’t have to wait long. According to the time stamp, it was roughly during the lunch rush, with what I could probably guess was a full dining room and a line up at the cash. From the angle of the camera, I had a great shot of a prep table, the door to the dining room and the stove. And there was the client’s husband, and a pretty attractive woman in her 40s. And then….

A few days later, I had retrieved the camera and looked at the recorded footage and captured the incriminating evidence. Job done, I went off to meet the client and we watched the footage together. It was… well… pretty graphic admittedly, but nothing I’ve never seen before. But while I wasn’t really fazed at all by the video, I was by my client’s reaction to it. ZERO. Nothing. She might as well have been reading the menu at a McDonald’s. This struck me as completely odd, as most clients have always reacted with some satisfaction, some sort of relief, anger, fear, even laughter. But this gal? She was stone cold still.

I almost jumped when she turned my way and asked me, “Can you play that again in a few minutes? My Dad is coming home.” Now let me explain the significance of this comment. This client was from an east Asian background, one of those that are very patriarchal in their views. Even after all of the years living in Canada, the concept of equality between man and woman wasn’t exactly very high on their list. The client had long since known about her husband’s infidelities, but no one would take her seriously whatsoever. Worse, she was even beaten up by both her husband and her father for making such accusations without proof. It was after such a beating that she had decided to come get professional help. She needed to make a point.

I thought the request was a little odd, but I didn’t dispute it. The client was paying my time, and my presence probably would have saved her from an immediate beating if her dad went ballistic. Either way, the video was hers now, and sure, why the hell not. Her dad was a man in his late 50s or so, but still in pretty good shape. He did however look pretty darn stern, the serious type of guy who always seems to be disapproving of anyone or anything that’s not of his world. Still, he calmly sat down as his daughter told him who I was, Well, the video started again. The husband was prepping some food with another attractive woman. He puts down the knife, and then quickly grabs the woman, flips up her skirt and I’ll leave the rest to you.

Strangely enough, my only reaction was that this guy was having sex with some woman on the prep table during lunch service. Having some relations with the restaurant industry, that was just disturbing to me. Well, the father was simply stone cold silent, but now you could kinda feel a seething amount of anger, even disgust now. That old saying, you can cut the tension with a knife? I doubt a machete could have gotten through that! My client simply turned around and said, “Dad, I told you MOM and (…) were having an affair!” Well, that was pretty much it. I stood up, simply asked for my cheque, and left. Given how supremely awkward this event had become, “discretion is the better part of valor” and all that. I left.

Now admittedly it probably wasn’t the best thing to leave the client alone, but I really didn’t want to be stuck in the middle of that mess. Would you? As for a tidy ending? Not really. I was paid for the job, so I know that the client survived and was going through divorce hearings. No idea about what happened to the mom or the husband, but some things are better left unsaid.

But I do have one quick tip. Next time you go to a shawarma shop/restaurant in town, are you really sure the garlic sauce is just that? Just sayin’.

Advertisements

An Anatomy of YYC Burger Week

YYC Burger Week, the little event that could. Founded by Sabahat Naureen (First Founder), myself as @calgarydreamer (co-founder) and Chris Karaplis, the mysterious promo shy man in the shadows, we were all former Montrealers who had found our home, and our hearts here in Calgary. But as much as we did, it didn’t seem to be enough to simply just be here. We had to help, but just didn’t know how.

The YYC Burger Week Logo

The YYC Burger Week Logo

In 2012, while on a routine visit to Montreal, Sabahat had visited Montreal, and partaken in their own Burger event. It was an in-house event, dedicated to simply self-promotion of the restaurants with a competition aspect. However, as I understand it, there was no charity aspect. With that, a light bulb went off in her head, and she came back wondering about how to make this event come into fruition in Calgary. Finding that no one else was even thinking of a similar idea, she started to put out little feelers here and there to assemble a team to organize the event. Seeing a kindred spirit, and a burger lover myself, I was the first volunteer right away.

I’ve known Sabahat and Chris for almost a year by then. Sabahat and I were members of the Yelp Elite, assembled by our friend and current world traveler Wendy Peters, and Chris had attended as Sab’s date often.  I had no idea who the heck was the people I would meet at the first meeting, and was shocked to find out that it was them. That January 2013, the work began. We managed to assemble 16 restaurants and parlay what strengths we had into a city wide festival. Sabahat was always stronger in terms of openness and self-promotion, but I was the one who had the restaurant connections, and usually preferred to be the overall support as well. More importantly, I had a good working relationship with the chefs which we all ran with. Chris, ever hiding in the background and preferring anonymity, designed the back end with the initial website and voting system.

The Competitors

The Competitors

We hemmed and hawed, Sabahat ever being the most ambitious one (I believed we needed months to prepare… we actually managed to get 95% of the work done in WEEKS). We all agreed, there was no way on earth we were going to promote a chain like McDonald’s and the like, and wanted to highlight the local talent and the best that Alberta agriculture had to offer. We designed a system of 16 restaurants being voted in by the public and hoped that by making the voting a little annoying (needing a unique email per vote) that it would reduce the cheating. We contacted 8 local charities (it would have been 9 as we almost signed up 18 restaurants, but we just couldn’t wait any longer for their legals).

The 2013 Nainalicious Winning Burger

The 2013 Nainalicious Winning Burger

Despite that, we were still pretty new at this sort of game. Understandably, some restaurants had considered us to be questionable as it was the inaugural year. Some were just too busy, although even now we would LOVE to see them enter and we would gladly invite them again and again. But then there were the one or two who were actually pretty insulting. I’ve heard some rumors that a few thought they weren’t invited because I disliked them personally. Nope, if anything, there were simply too many restaurants that we sent invites in 2 waves, with a 3rd had it been necessary. Once the initial 16 spots were full, it was done. But then again, that’s the name of the game really.

The competition started, and it wasn’t without a few hiccups, but with such fantastic people as Anju’s Roy Oh (missing you this year), downtownfood’s Darren Maclean, Notable’s Michael Noble and more, it came across as a triumph. Still there were a few more problems, but it was a great week.

In the end? We raised over $6300 in a week of burger frenzy. We were a bit too ambitious in terms of charitable givings as we had tried to promote EIGHT charities at once. To try to spread the funds evenly, we partnered them with 2 restaurants each, one that we considered a heavyweight to every newbie, but it didn’t work entirely the way we wanted. Still, everyone got a lot of promo, and we had cemented ourselves as part of Calgary history, even if just for a brief blip in time. More importantly, a great story came about as little Naina’s Kitchen, the smallest and the least known of all 16 places, came out the 2013 Champion. Looking at owner Erin’s face was worth it all, and we couldn’t have been more pleased.

This year, it was much easier, but far more ambitious. We asked over 50 restaurants to join, but put in a caveat that it was a first come first serve basis. Originally we were shooting for 20, with only 2 categories in the $10 and $15, but as the names came in, we soon found that would be impossible. We ended up selecting 30 competitors, and learned from the previous year to ensure a great selection for our participants by adding the $20 category. Again, we also dared the chefs to come up with something unique, something special. It had bothered us a little that in Year One, many of the restaurants simply put up an existing burger on their menu up for the challenge. But this year? They REALLY stepped up, with so many imaginative takes on burgers made of elk, bannock, cranberries, sprouts, hemp, lobster, pork, beef of all sorts and cuts, foie gras, ramen, bao, mac n’ cheese, pepper steak, ahi tuna and more. It always surprises me by the creative energy of our chefs, and how wonderful it is to be a part of that scene in our small way. And to help promote such creativity, we created the Burger Ambassadors, comprised of some of the best food writer, personalities and bloggers in Calgary. They’ve done a great job, and their comments have help the diners choose their preferences.

Blowfish Sushi Lounge's Ramen Burger

Blowfish Sushi Lounge’s Ramen Burger

We also started looking for funding again, since we thought that it might not be as hard as last year, but was surprised that it was actually even harder as our contacts for many organizations had changed, and had to re-justify ourselves. More so, while YYC Burger Week came about, so did literally dozens of other new food festivals, and we ended up having to compete ourselves in a much bigger forum.

But as a wise man once said… the universe will listen. Things will work out somehow.

It did. We still worked on everything, and refused to compromise on our principals to promote Alberta restaurants, talent and produce. I wager that if we were willing to do so, funding would probably would have been a lot easier, but then, what would have been the point? We are CALGARY STRONG. It’s our home, and we wanted dearly to be at the heart of it all. More importantly, we found ourselves ever more in love with our city, and found inspiration in the people that united for those shining moments after the Floods. There would be NO compromise.

The team also expanded this year, with great new members joining in. Wanda Baker, noted food blogger of Baker’s Beans, came in with her knowledge and experience, and insight on how to approach matters while ensuring that the t’s were crossed and the i’s were dotted. Trevor Gibbons, our surprise Unofficial Judge in the Bacon Suit in 2013, also leaped in, and brought in a new energy and great ideas to promote our festival. More members with unique strengths still joined in, and now we number 11 strong. It’s a great team, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

With those skills, connections and energy, and the excited inclusion of ATB Agriculture, we found our little festival now stood toe to toe with some of the best festivals in the city. To date as I write this, there has been literally THOUSANDS of tweets, and who knows how many people out there roaming the city, discovering new and old restaurants for the first time, and personally challenging themselves to try all THIRTY burgers (for those who are doing so, I recommend our next festival YYC Soup and Salad Week…). We’ve been in tv, radio, print, and online all over the city. The restaurants are being lauded, tried out and challenged creatively in a fun and unusual way. And at the heart of it all, the 3 charities chosen this year will greatly benefit from the exposure and the funds.

So that’s really that for now. YYC Burger Week is almost at it’s 1/2 way point, and we’re seeing such an incredible energy through the city as people run into the restaurants with their passports. We love it. I love it.

To Calgary, from the 3 founders and the 8 new committee members, this is our labour of love, and our gift to the city. And we can’t wait until 2015.

Bon Appetit. And don’t forget to stamp your passport and VOTE by RATING your favorite burgers!